Michael Bodley


Michael Bodley is the former Editor-in-Chief of The Pendulum. The recovering news editor is a 2015 News21 Fellow and former Baltimore Sun intern. In his free time, Michael enjoys rooting loudly for his hometown Orioles and Ravens, as well as the occasional nap


Recent Articles

NEWS 9/15/15 1:00pm

With upcoming elections, Elon political interest pops

Ever since the first presidential candidates announced their runs earlier this year, a slow but steady buzz has been building at Elon University around the direction the country could take, depending on who wins the White House. As debate season swings into high-gear, a storm of media coverage has propelled campus conversation, with groups of liberals and conservatives divided down party lines opponents each call radical.


NEWS 9/1/15 11:30am

Elon purchases land for proposed convocation center

Elon University announced Tuesday it has purchased 19.5 acres of land just west of campus as the preferred site of the proposed convocation center. The land is west of Hunt Softball Park and the adjacent parking lot on North Williamson Avenue. According to a release, the purchase is being funded by a gift from Furman Moseley ‘56 and his wife Susan, for whom the Moseley Center is named after.


NEWS 8/23/15 1:14pm

On college campuses, political correctness called into question

In one Elon University classroom, a novel examining the systematic rape of thousands of Muslim women in the Balkans comes with no trigger warning. Safia Swimelar, an associate professor of political science and policy studies at Elon, makes no apologies for how she teaches “S: A Novel About the Balkans.” She said facilitating conversations about the book’s graphic content are difficult, but well worth having.


NEWS 6/19/15 8:10am

Elon graduate signed to Lollapalooza, taking EDM by storm

From fiddling with Garage Band in an Elon University dorm room, Tyler Marenyi ’13 – better known by his stage name, NGHTMRE – has from a home base in Los Angeles built an international following in the electronic dance music industry. Though the young graduate majored in finance and picked up an accounting minor, Marenyi grew disillusioned fast with his studies, which started to feel like a whole lot of going through the motions for the aspiring musician. “Every day at the end of class I was like, ‘I just want to go back and work on music,’” Marenyi said.


NEWS 5/14/15 5:58pm

Starbucks on hold for Elon after opposition

ORIGINAL STORY: Starbucks announced for downtown Elon, controversy brews Following widespread grassroots opposition against Elon University's plans to bring a Starbucks to campus in the fall, the school is taking a step back, saying it needs more time to develop a "more comprehensive" plan for the area's future. Starbucks will not be coming to campus for at least a year, and perhaps longer, according to E-Net on Thursday.


NEWS 5/5/15 7:21pm

Starbucks announced for downtown Elon, controversy brews

Plans by Elon University to bring a Starbucks to campus next fall have been met with fierce grassroots opposition, saying the corporate coffee giant will disrupt local business and impede the growing artisan vibe of downtown Elon. Patrons of The Oak House — a locally owned and operated coffee, beer and wine shop that opened its N.


NEWS 4/29/15 10:17pm

Student hit by car begins rehabilitation

Gabriela Rosales, the freshman who was critically injured after she was hit by a car on campus in mid-March, has been transferred to WakeMed Health and Hospitals to begin the rehabilitation phase of her recovery. Last week, Rosales was assessed by a team of therapists to design her rehabilitation plan — which is expected to take three to five hours a day, according to the freshman’s Caring Bridge page. The recovery has been said to be slow for Rosales.


NEWS 3/7/15 2:00pm

Taking flight at Elon aviation

The latest addition to the Triad’s aircraft industry, Elon Aviation, looks to get more would-be pilots into the air and capitalize on growing local demand. After longtime FAA-certified flight instructor Chris Whittle struck out on his own to launch the business last December, the startup has already expanded in hiring another instructor and  is considering adding two more planes to its current couple-sized fleet. Calling his biggest challenge “the fear of stepping out into the unknown,” Whittle has sold about a half-dozen students on his personal flying philosophy, which requires singular focus, then drilling and drilling until a maneuver is mastered. One of them, Raleigh resident Joe Clarke, pegged the cost of obtaining his FAA-certified private pilot’s license at $8,000 — $1,000 more than Whittle estimated for an average price tag of $8,000.